Film news: ZOMBIE SPRING BREAKERS (aka IBIZA UNDEAD) gets US release in 76 Cinemark theatres on Nov 2.

Premiere in LA with actress/producer Marcia do Vales in attendance

Marcia Do Vales, who, as Maria, kick-asses her way through Brit zomcom Ibiza Undead, will represent the film at its LA premiere on Thurs 2 Nov, which is hosted by US Film Studio & Distributor, The Asylum.

Now called ZOMBIE SPRING BREAKERS, Brazilian-born Marcia do Vales, who is about to shoot the leading role in supernatural thriller QUAIL HOLLOW, says: “I loved being part of this film, so am really pleased to have the opportunity to attend the US premier. With So few independent British films getting a theatrical release in the US it’s a real testament to the hard work that we put in to make this film something truly fun for the zombie fans everywhere!”

Here’s the trailer: https://youtu.be/bBh89dEl9Xo

 

Production details of QUAIL HOLLOW, directed by Spaniard Javier De Prado, and produced by UK’s Templeheart Films, will be announced soon, as will further news of Paul Hyett’s HERETIKS, which Marcia co-produced. Marcia is also currently prepping The Foreseen, a twisted haunted house thriller, to be directed by Anthony Melton and Ben Franklin.

Press contact and interview requests:
Greg Day
Clout Communications
greg@cloutcom.co.uk 07889 861646

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Ahead of the UK premiere of his latest film TERRIFIER at the Horror Channel Frightfest Halloween event, director Damien Leone talks about the ’Art’ of extreme horror clowning, his debt to Tom Savini and a terrifying Halloween experience…

Q: Art The Clown initially appeared in your 2008 short THE 9th CIRCLE, then the 2011 award-winning short TERRIFIER and in your first feature ALL HALLOW’S EVE. What made you decide to give him a fourth outing?

DAMIEN: Up until this point I never felt like I fully showcased Art’s potential. I believe between the short films and All Hallows’ Eve, there only exists about 20 minutes of Art the Clown screen time. For a character who’s done so little, he seems to really resonate with horror fans. After all of the positive feedback, a full length film that focused solely on Art was inevitable.

Q: Art has a very twisted personality – he’s both brutal (his silence adding to his deadliness) and comical but not without some subtle pathos. How difficult was it to strike that balance?

DAMIEN: In all honesty, I never intended to evoke any sort of pathos from his character. I do find that interesting and maybe there is something to that but the brutality and twisted personality was always intentional from the get-go as was the subtle comedy. Although I’m a huge fan of some horror comedies like Return of The Living Dead or Evil Dead 2, it’s not a style I strive for in my own films. I always shoot for a more serious tone but ironically, the comedy in Terrifier was very organic and almost wrote itself. I should be clear and say the intentional comedy in Terrifier only comes from the Art the Clown character himself. He’s always had a sick sense of humour from the very beginning but this time I tried to take it a little further whereas after every unspeakable act of violence he commits, he follows it with something comical like a facial expression or a quirky gesture. This does two things, it gives the audience a chance to relieve some tension but it also makes Art more demented when we realize just how much fun he’s having at his victim’s expense.

Q: You’ve said that you set out to make Art as violent as possible. Why?

DAMIEN. This basically comes from the fact that I’m a special effects artist. I knew the effects would be one of our strong suits going into the film since I can do a lot on a very limited budget. There is so much content out there right now and I believe that if you want to stand out, it doesn’t hurt to show things that will really grab the audience’s attention and get them talking. It’s 2017; there’s been thousands of horror movies. I mean how many times can you show a knife cutting through the air followed by a shot of blood hitting the wall? Almost everything has been done to death (pun intended) so I feel I have a duty to the audience to present them with stuff that hasn’t quite been seen before or if it has, to do it in a way that feels fresh.

Q: David Howard Thornton is terrific as Art. How did you two meet and bond? And how challenging was it, given Art had previously been played by Mike Giannelli.

DAMIEN. Finding a new actor to play Art was by far the most crucial and nerve-wracking aspect of this film. Everything people loved about Art was a testament to how Mike Giannelli portrayed him and now I had to start from scratch. Very frightening indeed. But as luck would have it, David came in for an audition one day and my producer and I immediately knew this was our guy. David pantomimed the act of stabbing someone to death and sawing their head off with great exuberance and glee. He’s also extremely animated, tall and thin. I always envisioned Art to be of a more slender build and I was excited to see what little quirks and nuances David could bring to the character. Working with David was a total delight from start to finish. We bonded immediately thanks to the countless hours in the makeup chair. Dave will joke and tell stories as I transform him into Art over the course of approximately three hours. We had to repeat this process well over 20 times during the shoot.

Q: The film has a very dark 70s/80s tone and the narrative is stripped down to the bone. What influences were at play here?

DAMIEN. The main objective was to keep it as close to the 20 minute short film as possible. The short film was a no holds barred, relentless, 70s-style grind house flick that was made to feel like an intense rollercoaster ride. That’s actually how I came up with the title Terrifier. To me “Terrifier” was more a reflection of the film as an experience and didn’t necessarily have anything specific to do with the characters or story. People responded so positively to the short film that I figured the best plan of attack would be to just make an 80 minute version of the 20 minute short. Essentially this would mean taking the best parts of a slasher film and eliminating as much of the filler as possible.

Q: With all the attention given to IT and Pennywise, does this tempt you even further to establish Art as a franchise and make more TERRIFIER films?

DAMIEN: Absolutely. Although we finally gave Art his own movie, we’ve only just scratched the surface. Now we have to dig a little deeper into his backstory. He has a ton of potential and I can see needing at least a couple of films to tell his full story. It’s too premature to say but numerous people have said he has the making of a horror icon. If this continues to be the case once Terrifier is released, it would be downright disrespectful to the character and to the fans to not produce more; just as long as we maintain some integrity and never jump the shark.

Q: All your films are set on Halloween night. Are you a fan of Halloween? Do you have a favourite Halloween / clown story?

DAMIEN. I am a huge fan of Halloween but the main reason I set Art the Clown’s films on Halloween is so it’s acceptable for a man to be walking the streets while dressed as a clown. This at least enables his victims to lower their guard around him when they first cross his path. If it was a hot August night and a mute clown sat across from you in a pizzeria, I think the cops would be called immediately. I do in fact have a personal Halloween story that stands out and I’ll try to make it quick. One night a few friends and I were driving home from a Halloween party and we passed a car on the side of the road that was turned completely on its side against the guard rail. We immediately pulled over and approached the vehicle. Two young women were inside the car. Apparently, the driver was drunk and fell asleep at the wheel. Thankfully, by some miracle, both girls were perfectly fine aside from being dazed and frightened but what makes this story worth telling is seeing my friend who’s 6’4 leap on top of the turned over car in full Spider-Man attire and pull the young women to safety. Surreal moment indeed.

Q: Who do you most admire in the horror genre?

DAMIEN. This is a very difficult question because I can throw around countless names and ramble on and on for hours but I must say I would not be where I am today if it wasn’t for the makeup effects maestro Tom Savini. When I was around 6 or 7 years old I stumbled upon a VHS tape called Scream Greats that changed my life. It was a documentary on Savini and it was the first time I saw how monsters were created. This video and also the making of Michael Jackson’s Thriller with Rick Baker really left an impression on me. I was fascinated by seeing people transformed into creatures. For years I would rent these films over and over but when I was around 12 years old, I finally owned a copy of Scream Greats. This time I actually began experimenting. My mother took me to a horror convention where I actually bought my first makeup kit, a 12oz bottle of mint flavoured blood and a real machete (dulled) with a semi-circle cut out of the blade. This is a classic Savini gag that he’s used in several movies. It creates the illusion that the machete is actually buried in your flesh when you place it against the skin or on top of your skull. As soon as I got home, I tried out all of my new goodies on my friends and myself. Savini introduced me to blood tubes, mortician’s wax, things that were more accessible to someone starting out. Soon I started filming the effects with a camcorder and eventually I began making my own little short films; which is how I became interested in the grander aspect of filmmaking. But even though as a filmmaker I’m influenced by countless artists from all genres, I really have to thank Savini for being the first person to show me the magic of filmmaking.

Q: Zombies or vampires?

DAMIEN. Very tough question. Zombies frighten me more than vampires. My favourite horror film of all time is Romero’s Dawn of the Dead and my dream project is an epic zombie film but The Lost Boys holds such a special place in my heart. I saw it in the theatres when I was literally 3 years old and it had such a profound effect on me. It’s one of my absolute favourites till this day and because of it, I love vampires so much. So to answer your question, I can’t choose.

Q: Finally, what’s next?

DAMIEN: There are a few awesome projects that I’d love to tackle but I think it would be foolish to sleep on the inevitable Terrifier sequel. Clowns are so hot right now because of IT and more and more people are starting to dig Art the Clown on a daily basis so I think we should strike while the iron’s hot before the killer clown sub-genre goes into hibernation for another 20 years.

TERRIFIER receives its UK premiere at Horror Channel FrightFest Halloween 2017 on Saturday 28 Oct, Empire Haymarket, 11.00pm.
Tickets: http://frightfest.nutickets.com/

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News release VAULT OF HORROR – THE ITALIAN CONNECTION To be unleashed on Dec 8

News release
VAULT OF HORROR – THE ITALIAN CONNECTION
To be unleashed on Dec 8

20 Classic tracks from the golden era of Italian Horror, featuring composers including STELVIO CIPRIANI, FABIO FRIZZI & ENNIO MORRICONE, with extensive biographical notes on each track by FrightFest’s ALAN JONES

The golden era of Italian horror dates from the early 60’s to the mid 80’s. During that time directors such as Mario Bava, Dario Argento, Lucio Fulci, Antonio Margheriti, Umberto Lenzi, Joe D’Amato, and Enzo. G. Castellari directed some of the most outrageous terror films ever. As well as depicting some of the most stylish and horrific on screen images their films included some of the most elegant and beautiful scores. The cult following for their movies is as popular now as it’s ever been.

VAULT OF HORROR – THE ITALIAN CONNECTION presents twenty of the most amazing film themes ever and is a heady mix of funk, disco, electronic and prog rock. It features composers such as Stelvio Cipriani, Franco Micalizzi, Roberto Donati, Carlo Rustichelli, Nico Fidenco, Ennio Morricone, Fabio Frizzi, Riz Ortolani and many more. There are also original soundtrack themes from such films as ‘Zombie Flesh Eaters’, ‘Cannibal Ferox’, ‘Blood And Black Lace’, ‘The Beyond’, ‘The New York Ripper’, ‘Tentacles’ and ‘City Of The Living Dead’.

The truly stunning, exclusive sleeve has been painted by renowned graphic designer & commercial artist Graham Humphreys and the biographical notes on each track are written by author, critic and FrightFest director Alan Jones. As an added bonus Demon Records are including a CD version in a replica card wallet as well as a stunning 12×12” reproduction collector’s art print of the sleeve painting.

Soundcloud: http://bit.ly/2xfgJaU

Trailer: https://youtu.be/vgV6gnqx0nk

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vaultofhorror1

Buy link: http://amzn.to/2zssh9m

CATALOGUE NO: DEMREC237
RELEASE DATE: 8th December 2017
FORMAT: 2 x 180G black vinyl with CD & 12×12 art print
CATEGORY: Soundtracks
BARCODE: 5014797896345


TRACKLISTING

DISC 1 SIDE A
Carlo Rustichelli – ‘Atelier (totoli)’ from ‘Blood And Black Lace ‘(‘Sei Donne Per L’Assassioni)’
Franco Micalizzi – ‘Seq 1’ from ‘The Last Hunter’ ‘(L’Ultimo Cacciatore)’
Nico Fidenco – ‘Seq 6’ from ‘Porno Holocaust’
Roberto Donati – ‘Main Theme’ from ‘Eaten Alive’ ‘(Mangiati Vivi!)’
Francesco De Masi – ‘New York One More Day’ from ‘The New York Ripper’ ‘(Lo Squatatore Di
New York)’

DISC 1 SIDE B
Franco Micalizzi feat. Warren Wilson – ‘Bargain With The Devil’ from ‘Beyond The Door’ ‘(Chi Sei)’
Stelvio Cipriani – ‘Small Town Pleasures’ from ‘Tentacles’ ‘(Tentacoli)’
Roberto Donati – ‘NYC Main Title’ from ‘Cannibal Ferox’
A. Blonksteiner – ‘Apocalypse’ from ‘Cannibal Apocalypse’ ‘(Apocalypse Domani)’
Carlo Maria Cordio – ‘Absurd’ from ‘Absurd’ ‘(Rosso Sangue)’

DISC 2 SIDE C
Fabio Frizzi – ‘Main Theme’ from ‘Zombie Flesh Eaters’ ‘(Zombi 2)’
Fabio Frizzi – ‘Mystery’s Apotheosis’ from ‘City Of The Living Dead’ ‘(Paura Nella Citta Dei Morti Viventi)’
Fabio Frizzi – ‘Voci Dal Nula’ from ‘The Beyond’ ‘(L’Aldila)’
Walter Rizatti– ‘I Remember’ from ‘House By The Cemetery’ ‘(Quella Villa Accanto Al Cimitero)’
Stefano Mainetti – ‘Main Theme’ from ‘Zombie Flesh Eaters 2’ ‘(Zombi 3)’

DISC 2 SIDE D
Walter Rizatti – ‘Main Theme’ from ‘Bronx Warriors’ ‘(1990: I Guerrieri Del Bronx)’
Claudio Simonetti – ‘Nuke Is Over’ from ‘The New Barbarians’ ‘(Nuovi Barbari)’
Riz Ortolani – ‘The Fighter Centurions’ from ‘Rome 2033 – The Fighter Centurions’ ‘(I Guerrieri Dell ‘Anno 2072)’
Ennio Morricone – ‘End Theme’ from ‘Holocaust 2000’
Nico Fidenco – ‘I Celebrate Myself’ from ‘Emanuelle In America’


Alan Jones is available for press/radio interviews (excluding October 18 – 25).

For more information, please contact:
Lidia Pini lidia.pini@demonmusicgroup.co.uk or David.Akerman@DemonMusicGroup.co.uk.

www.demonmusicgroup.co.uk

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Ahead of the UK premiere of his debut feature HOSTILE at the Horror Channel Frightfest Halloween event, director Mathieu Turi talks Tarantino, tough shoots and his reveals his ‘magic hour’.

Q: You were born in Cannes so you grew up with film all around? When did you know for sure you wanted to direct?

I think it’s always been there. As a child, I used to steal my dad’s VHS camera to make mini-movies. They were basically all about my Jurassic Park toys eating my dog or invading the garden. Later, I did more elaborate short films with friends, instead of studying. Then, I remember watching BRAVEHEART and the making of the movie. For the first time, I knew that directing was something I wanted to do for a living.

Q: You have been second unit director and assistant director on numerous major blockbusters – SHERLOCK HOLMES 2, INGLORIOUS BASTARDS, G.I. JOE – what was the movie or director you feel you learnt most from?

Tarantino, with no hesitation. ‘INGLORIOUS BASTARDS was one of my first jobs in the movie business, and I was assistant of the assistant of the assistant. But when you work on the set of someone you admire, It’s very special. I learnt that you have to love what you do, and as a director, you have to stay focused on the actors and the scene. Nothing else matters. Working for Quentin Tarantino was my best set experience as an A.D.

Q: What inspired the HOSTILE script?

A lot of stuff. HOSTILE is a kind of mix between my two shorts (SONS OF CHAOS and BROKEN). The first is a post-apocalyptic, very low-budget movie, and the second is a romance in an elevator. And If you talk about exterior inspirations, I would say the main one is I AM LEGEND, the Richard Matheson book. It’s my favourite book ever, a masterpiece. I read it twice a year, and it’s never the same feeling. Also, I’m a huge fan of the video game THE LAST OF US. It has everything : a perfect story, focused on characters but in an original post-apocalyptic context, with never seen creatures, and the end is magic. I’s love to see a movie adaptation of it, but It would be tricky.

Q: HOSTILE was executive produced by Xavier Gens and stars Brittany Ashworth from his new movie THE CRUCIFIXION. Can you talk about his influences and that of recent extreme French genre titles?

Xavier is a good friend of mine, and also my mentor since the beginning. He’s the one who presented me to FullTime Films producers (Thomas Lubeau, Eric Gendarme and Olivier Chateau) as they were looking for projects. We all met at the Cannes film fest in 2015, and two years later, here we are! He also helped us to find Brittany Ashworth, as he had worked with her on THE CRUCIFIXION. HOSTILE is not influenced by any of them, but I’m very happy that all those movies got made. You know, in France, It’s not easy to do that kind of extreme genre movie.

Q: HOSTILE builds to a wonderful emotional epiphany. Was the story all about leading to that rare moment in zombie movies?

It’s the first scene that came to my mind before writing the script, and without spoiling it, it was also the best moment on set. It was just magical – the natural light at that exact time (D.O.P’s calls it the “magic hour”).The team was speechless, and in my mind, I knew It worked. Often, as a director, you have to wait to be in the editing room to be hundred percent sure a scene works, but for that one, I knew on set.

Q: None of this would work unless you cared about the characters, especially Juliette. Did her back-story change through successive drafts of the screenplay?

Not complete scenes, but dialogue and actions changed a lot. I’m a very collaborative director with my actors, and I want them to dig into the characters, try stuff, fail sometimes, but always try to go further. And they did, every time. Juliette’s backstory has been completed by Brittany. I gave her some intentions, but asked her to find a personal story, why she came to New-York and what happened in the first years of her post-apocalyptic life. We talked a lot about it, very detailed stuff that only her and I know. Actually, we could easily do a prequel about it!

Q: We love Grégory Fitoussi in the UK because of the French law and order drama SPIRAL. Was that a reason for casting him as Jack?

I really wanted someone with a true charisma. Grégory is one of those guys. He could just walk in the room and you feel it. It’s a very rare power. And also, we worked a lot together on the character, to keep his French touch intact, but not fall in the cliché. Jack needed to be very confident, strong and mysterious. He’s the entire reason for the flash-backs, so we had to keep in mind that Juliette felt secure with him, and that’s what she doesn’t have any more in the present.

Q: And we also love Javier Botet who seems to be in so many movies at the moment. What did he add to his Living Dead role that no one else could have?

Two things: the first is obvious, and that’s why he’s in all those movies. (REC, MAMA, ALIEN:COVENANT, IT). He has an incredible body, and he uses it like magic. When you see him working, it’s just insane. The movements he performs, the way his thin body moves. He’s a piece of art. The second thing: he’s a very good actor, and that’s vital for that kind of role. You can’t imagine how hard it is to express yourself under the makeup. And Javier does it perfectly.

Q: Your feature debut; what was the biggest learning curve you hadn’t expected?

That you have to sleep an entire month to get back on your feet! More seriously, I would say It was very hard to go from one team to another, as our shoot was only 24 days, in three different continents. So we had the New-York Unit, the Morocco Unit and the Paris Unit, with different crews, productions offices, preps, etc… But on the other hand it has been an incredible adventure, and I had the chance to work with all those amazing people.

Q: Will you always stay in horror or is it a stepping stone to other genres? Can you tell us what you’re working on at the moment?

HOSTILE is kind of a two genre movie, I just love to cross lines. But I love horror, sci-fi, thrillers… And I’m working on a very crazy project right now. It should be official soon, but I just can say that it’s a sci-fi-fi/horror movie with a unique concept. We are in the casting phase right now, with the same producers at FullTime Films, and we will shoot it next spring. I can’t wait to talk about it, and I hope we will see each other again at FrightFest next year to show it!

HOSTILE receives its UK premiere at Horror Channel FrightFest Halloween 2017 on Saturday 28 Oct, Empire Haymarket, 12.05pm.
Tickets: http://frightfest.nutickets.com/

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FILM NEWS (UK): Horror Channel devotes November to Bloody Brits and rampaging sharks.

November promo trailer:
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ebA0a6KfV6o&feature=youtu.be)
 

Dog Soldiers

November on Horror Channel has a distinctive cutting-edge with a Saturday night prime-time BLOODY BRITISH SEASON, celebrating the new wave of British horror movies that reinvigorated the UK horror industry in the early 2000s. There are 9pm network premieres for Neil Marshall’s sensational werewolf debut feature DOG SOLDIERS (2002) (Sat 11 Nov); his monstrous all-female star cast follow-up THE DESCENT (2005) (Sat 25 Nov), Christopher Smith’s underground ghost train journey through hell, CREEP (2004) (Sat 18 Nov); and Nick Hamm’s psychologically gripping THE HOLE (2001) (Sat 4 Nov), with Keira Knightley in her first significant film role.
Sharknado 5: Global Swarming

And the cuts get deeper with a SHARKMANIA MARATHON – a slew of six salt-water B-movie shockers on Sunday 12 October, highlighted by the network premieres of the last two
adventures in the sky-flying sharks cult franchise SHARKNADO 4: THE 4TH AWAKENS (2016) at 8.10pm and SHARKNADO 5: GLOBAL SWARMING (2017) on at 9.50pm. The other teeth-chattering offerings are: PLANET OF THE SHARKS (2016), SUPER SHARK (2011), ICE SHARKS (2016) and THE REEF (2010).

There are seven other primetime network premieres this month: M. Night Shyamalan’s boldly unsettling survival movie THE HAPPENING (2008), starring Mark Wahlberg; Paul Schrader’s hypnotic & erotic classic CAT PEOPLE (1982); Christopher Smith’s hilariously shocking SEVERANCE (2006) starring Danny Dyer and Andy Nyman; Victor Salva’s dazzling American Gothic sequel JEEPERS CREEPERS 2 (2003); SILENT HILL (2006), Christophe Gans’s eerie adaptation of Konami’s video game series of the same name; Fran Rubel Kuzui’s BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER (1992), starring Donald Sutherland, Rutger Hauer and Hilary Swank; and croc-shocker LAKE PLACID 2 (2007).

Sharknado 5: Global Warming

Jeepers Creepers 2

PLUS…Season 2 of the classic sci-fi series LOST IN SPACE transports us back to our favourite cosmic family from Tues 14 October, weekdays at 20:00. Created and produced by Irwin Allen, the hugely popular franchise follows the adventures of the Robinsons and their surprisingly human Robot, a family of space colonists who struggle to survive in a strange and often hostile universe after their ship is sabotaged by the roguish Dr Zachary Smith and thrown off course.

TV: Sky 319 / Virgin 149 / Freesat 138 | Freeview 70
www.horrorchannel.co.uk | twitter.com/horror_channel | facebook.com/horrorchannel

Press enquiries:
Greg Day, Clout Communications
greg@cloutcom.co.uk 07889 861646

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Ahead of the UK premiere of his latest film IT CAME FROM THE DESERT at the Horror Channel Frightfest Halloween event, director Marko Mäkilaakso shares his admiration for Roger Corman, love of B-Movies, spoofing and overcoming homeland obstacles

IT CAME FROM THE DESERT is inspired by Cinemaware’s cult 1980s video game, which in turn was motivated by the giant creature feature craze infesting 1950s Hollywood. What was the main inspiration for you?

MARKO: There’s so many movies and makers which inspired ICFTD, but the main inspiration was exactly that; creature feature infested 1950s Hollywood films, and the legendary Cinemaware Desert games and creature features and action comedies I grew up with in the 1980s. I love B-movies and mainstream filmmakers who give homages to those in their works, like Joe Dante, John Landis, Tim Burton, Steven Spielberg etc. There’s something so pure and honest about B-movies and even though done with tight budgets you can see and feel that the makers put their hearts and souls into making the movie. That’s really inspiring!

I’ve always loved Cannon Films action movies like American Ninja and Delta Force, and comedies like Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure, Ed Wood, The Burbs’ as well as creature features like Piranha and Gremlins. 1980’s TV shows like V, Knight Rider, Street Hawk, Amazing Stories and I am sure there’s a little bit something from all of those in my movie.

The modern creature feature craze are the Syfy channel movies. Some of them are fun, but most of them are too lazy and poorly done. I don’t mind low budgets, but when companies just want to cash in without any passion to the project then it’s doomed from the very beginning. Roger Corman did it correctly! He hired passionate filmmakers to give their everything and in the end the movies had something extra, something special. Like the It Came from the Desert game was spoofing those and other 1950s monster movies, my movie is also spoofing the modern creature feature craze of Syfy movies.

It’s smartly scripted, extremely funny, with an OTT deadpan delivery. How did you go about developing and writing the script to achieve that style?

MARKO: Nice to hear, thank you! The tone of the movie was very clear to me from the very beginning. I couldn’t see the movie done in any other way. This was my love letter to movies I grew up with. I wanted to bring back this kind of old school ”Bill & Ted’s excellent adventure” style of characters and the silly and fun moments that brings.

I wrote the first draft which was still much leaner and meaner in scope but had the story, main characters, tone and comedy already set and once Cinemaware gave their blessing to ”adapt” the game we expanded the scope. Talented writer Hank Woon came on board and wrote the next drafts expanding the tale. And then I wrote a few drafts mainly to keep the humor and action the way I imagined it.

Then UK based AMP joined the party to co-produce and co-finance the movie and they suggested that talented filmmaker Trent Haaga polish the script. Trent got the tone right away. He did a wonderful job and made the script even better!

Also one crucial element was the casting. I went thru many, many actors to find the right cast who got the tone and could deliver the humour I was aiming for. The cast was just perfect for their roles and I had the luxury to allow them to improvise while shooting. I think the movie got funnier and funnier while shooting and that’s only because we did the casting right!

The giant ant special effects are terrific. Is it true they are a homage to Ray Harryhausen?

MARKO: Ray Harryhausen was AMAZING! I love his work and there’s definitely some Harryhausen spirit in the ant effects. Production designer / co-ant designer / practical ant effect creator Kari kankaanpää and I are both big fans of Harryhausen’s work, stop motion and miniatures. We even thought about using some miniatures in the movie, but the budget disagreed with that crazy idea. I actually have a movie treatment ready which is homage to Harryhausen and Toho. I even sent it to Julie & Roger Corman. It’s awesome and hope it will get made someday.

It’s been described as a ‘pulp action horror mutant monster movie’. Is that what you set out to make?

MARKO: I set out to make a fun, entertaining, nostalgic, pulpy action-adventure-comedy-creature feature with a touch of horror, so yes.. that sounds about right!

You’re known internationally for your strong visual style. How much does being a successful music video director influence your movie career?

MARKO: I think that has a lot to do with who I am as a director and also how I work. Music videos have been a great learning ground for filmmaking. You need to shoot fast and make cool looking images and tell a story (if the video has any) in a visual way. So, yes, I owe a lot to that. But of course making a movie is completely its own beast.

You come from Finland. How important a part would you say your native roots play when writing and directing?

MARKO: You know, that’s tricky thing for me. I always felt that I was born in the wrong country because of the kind of movies I wanted to make. I was never taken seriously or supported much by the Finnish film industry, except by the great filmmaker Antti J. Jokinen who gave my start.

People look down on these kind of genre movies and that’s sad I think and that’s why I packed my bags eight years ago and moved away from Finland. Don’t get me wrong, I do love my country, but it also pushed me away. I was the outsider in the industry with weird ideas and thoughts of making action horror movies. I was literally laughed at! So I went elsewhere and made my two first movies with countries and people who did get it. Even now, I am not considered as a ”serious filmmaker” because of the movies I make, but I am happy that Desert is a Finnish co-production.
We also shot one week in Finland which was a wild contrast coming from hot Spain to cold wintery Finland. I give all the respect in the world to Finnish Film Foundation who bravely supported and gave financing to the movie. Trust me; it’s a really brave thing to do in Finland! So maybe after this movie the Finns we’ll see that’s I am not giving up and I’m still making these genre movies which I LOVE from the bottom of my heart!

Your debut film was the well-received action / horror WAR OF THE DEAD, which you also wrote and co-produced. Have you always been drawn to the horror genre?

MARKO: I love horror! I love action! I love comedy! I love drama! Dammit! I love movies no matter what the genre is! But horror has a special place in my heart. It’s so honest and visual genre. We all have nightmares and fears and it’s very easy to identify with those no matter how fantastical it is. It’s the primal fear in all of us and it is so damn fun to watch knowing that no matter what happens you’ll be safe! Shooting horror is also lots of fun and horror is also a genre where you can mix action and comedy without rules. Just pure damn FUN!

After DEADLY DESCENT, your savage, war-like abominable snowman movie for Syfy and Universal, you turned your hand to a home-grown family comedy film, ELLA AND FRIENDS 2. Why?

MARKO: Well, that’s good question. I have kids, three of them, and they are dying to see movies I’ve directed, but I can’t really show them, so out of the blue I was offered to direct ELLA 2 and I was shocked! Me? A Kid’s movie? Maybe the producer liked my more family friendly music videos and stuff. No matter what this was a wonderful opportunity to make something for my kids and also to direct my first Finnish movie and my first comedy! So I took the job with open arms. My oldest daughter, my dad and my brother are in it and I’m acting in it too!. It’s a real family affair! And I was working with one of my childhood heroes, Pirkka-Pekka Petelius, a comic genius!

You’ve also appeared as an actor in two of your films. Will we see more of you in front of the camera in future?

MARKO: Ha! Funny thing was that I had a real character in War of the Dead. I played Corporal Peter Jackson and I had few dialogue scenes with Andrew Tiernan who played the lead, but I needed to move along faster with the story and I cut out those scenes. I am still in the movie, but not talking. Maybe better so! Ella 2 was an opportunity to act a small role, so I did it. It was lots of fun! I am also in ICFTD, but briefly in the background. So more acting in the future? Well, maybe more cameos!

Finally, what’s next? Will you stick with action horror?

MARKO: Not sure yet. There’s many projects in development, but let’s see which one gets first financed. There’s definitely more action horror coming!

It Came From the Desert receives its UK premiere at Horror Channel FrightFest Halloween 2017 on Saturday 28 Oct, Empire Haymarket, 4.10pm.
Tickets: http://frightfest.nutickets.com/

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Film news (UK): Remastered social network horror PANIC BUTTON has hard-core new trailer

Set for Oct 23 DVD & Download release, courtesy of Trinity Film.

Chris Crow’s ground-breaking, psycho-cyber horror thriller PANIC BUTTON gets a remastered launch on DVD & Download on Oct 23 and Trinity Film has released a brand new trailer today.

Trailer link: https://youtu.be/EFP3smhP_D4

SYNOPSIS:
Four young people win a trip of a lifetime to New York, courtesy of their favourite social-networking website – All2gethr.com. On board the private jet, their mysterious host invites to take part in the in-flight entertainment – a new online gaming experience. But this is no ordinary game. Trapped at 30,000 feet, they are forced to play for their lives and the lives of their loved ones. They are about to learn that putting your life online can have deadly offline consequences and that there no ESC key…

The impressive DVD EXTRAS include an Audio Commentary with writers Frazer Lee, John Shackleton & David Shillitoe, a Guerrilla Filmmakers Masterclass and ‘Flight School’ – How to get a film off the ground. In addition there is a Trailer Galler, Gag reel, some outtake/deleted scenes and a ‘Making of’ Gallery.

Panic Button, made in 2011, was one of the first British horror films to explore the dark side of social networking and the perils of sharing too much information online. Played out in a claustrophobic, almost real-time situation, the film taps into pertinent social issues that now have a universal significance in the digital age. Themes such as social media crime, identity theft, cyber bullying, voyeurism, peer pressure, child safety and terrorism all come into play, at a time when iPads and smart phone apps were only in their early generations.

Trailer will be screened at the Horror Channel FrightFest Halloween event on Sat 28 Oct, Empire Haymarket.

PURCHASE LINKS:

Download

DVD

PRODUCT INFORMATION:

TITLE: Panic Button
Release Date: On DVD & Digital Download from October 23, 2017
Format: DVD
RRP: £12.99
BBFC: Certificate 18
Genre: Horror, Thriller
Running Time: 95 minutes
Language: English
Country of origin: UK
Distributor: Trinity Film

CREDITS:
PANIC BUTTON is a MOVIE MOGUL PRODUCTION, starring SCARLETT ALICE JOHNSON JACK GORDON MICHAEL JIBSON ELEN RHYS and JOSHUA RICHARDS.
Costume Designer: SIAN JENKINS, Hair and make up by VICTORIA NORTHBROOKE Production Designer: TIM DICKEL, Director of Photography: SIMON POULTER, Edited by JOHN GILLANDERS, music by MARK RUTHERFORD, Line Producer: GARETH I DAVIES, co-producer: DAVID SHILLITOE
Written by FRAZER LEE, JOHN SHACKLETON, DAVID SHILLITOE & CHRIS CROW
Produced by JOHN SHACKLETON & directed by CHRIS CROW

Press contact:
Greg Day – Clout Communications UK
greg@cloutcom..co.uk 07889 861646 www.twitter.com/cloutcomcouk

 

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Ahead of the UK premiere of his latest film HOUSEWIFE at the Horror Channel Frightfest Halloween event, director Can Evrenol tells us why film is a “pervert’s art”, shares his feelings for Fulci and reveals his contribution to Horror Anthology The Field Guide To Evil.

Was it important to make your follow-up film to BASKIN in the English language?

CAN: I wanted to make the film available for a wider audience and to test myself with a different language movie. I thought it was a fun thing to do.

How do you describe HOUSEWIFE? What would be your perfect pitch line?

CAN: Man, I had this crazy fu*ked-up dream last night! Do you want to see it?

Like BASKIN, HOUSEWIFE shares many similar themes of sexuality, family, social claustrophobia and surreal nightmares.
Why are these elements so important to you?

CAN: The day I find out why, I would probably quit filmmaking and move onto more tangible things in life.

Elaborate more on why you say HOUSEWIFE is your homage to Dario Argento and Lucio Fulci?

CAN: I am very inspired by Dario Argento and Lucio Fulci films. Fulci is one of the reasons I decided to be a filmmaker. They are more like crazy people painting with their own blood. I love their attention to weird details and emphasis on atmosphere and music, while some others aspects of their filmmaking seems super shallow and cheap. I am not intending my films to be shallow and cheap at any level, but I’m taking huge risks and sometimes when there are flaws, I try to make them in tune with the madness of the movie.

Where did you find lead actress Clémentine Poidatz and actor David Sakurai, who plays the head of the Umbrella of Love and Mind Cult?

CAN: I met Clementine in Paris, through my French producers Vixens. We clicked right away. I thought she had the right face and state of mind. She read the script and said she loved it. I thought she must either a really good actress or crazy. Turns out she was a bit of both. We were blessed to have her as Holly. She was the angel of our team from day 1!

David, I met in Fantasticfest, 2015. He was there with Liza The Fox Fairy. You gotta love that dancing grim reaper character! At the time, my reference for Bruce O’Hara was Joel Osteen. But after sharing the same taxi to the airport with David Sakurai, talking about movies and martial arts, he was the face of Bruce O’Hara for me. I really love both Holly and Bruce O’Hara. They are like my friends now, thanks to Clementine and David.

You don’t make your films easy for the audience to either watch or follow, is it important to make them invest more in your quirky ideas?

CAN: It’s all about submitting yourself to somebody else’s dream. That’s why it’s the pervert’s art. For me, that’s the most precious and unique thing about cinema. I also try to lose myself – as coherently as ı can – during the various stages of filmmaking. It’s tricky, confusing and soul consuming, and people think you don’t know about or care about the narrative, but it’s not that. I love it so far.

Talk a little about your relationship with co-writer Cem Ozuduru who you worked with on both films?

CAN: Cem is the reason I launched into Housewife after Baskin. It all started in our post Baskin movie nights. We had an overdose of male synergy in Baskin so this time we were chatting about making a revenge movie of sorts with a female lead. Then we decided to add some alien conspiracy in it. Then we went for English language. Then I think, it was me at some point who pushed it more to the way of dreams and dream logic. I felt that I had to bring it home. But the last 20 minutes were always there form the earliest draft.

Making a personal film is like searching for your inner child. And in this movie at some point, my inner child and Cem’s turned out to be different people. So we had some trouble keeping up the same dream together. And Cem had to leave the project for some days during the shoot and then in the editing too, because he was offered a top notch TV series work as writer and co-director. So ultimately I think Housewife ended up more of a film from my instinct, rather than the collaboration we started with. But still, Cem has been the biggest support for both Baskin and Housewife. Both times he was much more than the co-writer, and storyboard artist.
We constantly share videos about cinematography, crazy movies, music and aliens. We will collaborate again for sure.

What are you hoping audiences will take from the film?

CAN: A little slice of death for their dreams.

What’s next? Will you stay with horror, or do you want to try something totally different?

CAN: I recently completed a new short film, a segment for the upcoming horror anthology: The Field Guide To Evil, from the producers of ABC’s of Death. I tried a different approach this time. Rather than the operatic, stylish and heavy metal tone I usually go for, this time I tried to make it more like an East European festival film, but with a slight dose of nightmares, and a demon of childbirth! The camera language is closer to what I want to aim for in my next projects.

Next, there’s a dark fairy tale that we have been cooking for a while with my producer Muge Buyuktalas. I’ll try to bend it to my own world as much as I can, but hope to aim it for kids.

Has the Turkish Film Industry taken note of your international success? Are they now more open to genre production?

CAN: No. I don’t think they have. After Stranger Things and It, you know every producer is talking about making a horror movie / series these days, but we hate those kinds of motivations, don’t we? They don’t lead to sincere work.

Housewife receives its UK premiere at Horror Channel FrightFest Halloween 2017 on Saturday 28 Oct, Empire Haymarket, 6.45pm.
Tickets: http://frightfest.nutickets.com/

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Film news (UK): Remastered social network horror PANIC BUTTON set for Oct 23 DVD release, courtesy of Trinity Film.

Chris Crow’s ground-breaking, hard-edged psycho-cyber horror thriller PANIC BUTTON gets a remastered launch on DVD & Download from October 23, 2017.

SYNOPSIS:
Four young people win a trip of a lifetime to New York, courtesy of their favourite social-networking website – All2gethr.com. On board the private jet, their mysterious host invites to take part in the in-flight entertainment – a new online gaming experience. But this is no ordinary game. Trapped at 30,000 feet, they are forced to play for their lives and the lives of their loved ones. They are about to learn that putting your life online can have deadly offline consequences and that there no ESC key…

Panic Button, made in 2011, was one of the first British horror films to explore the dark side of social networking and the perils of sharing too much information online. Played out in a claustrophobic, almost real-time situation, the film taps into pertinent social issues that now have a universal significance in the digital age. Themes such as social media crime, identity theft, cyber bullying, voyeurism, peer pressure, child safety and terrorism all come into play, at a time when iPads and smart phone apps were only in there early generations.

Producer John Shackleton reflects: “iPad’s were not really a thing in 2010 when we were planning Panic Button as the first generation iPad was only released in the US April of that year. We knew we wanted touch screen technology in the jet and so went to great lengths to achieve that despite not having access to that early tech. We wanted our villain to be hiding behind the animated emoji of an Alligator, a subversion of the networking site in the film. Facial tracking was impossible for us in 2010 so we animated it and comped it together in crude form like he was an early adopter of new technology. Now, with the new iPhone X, anyone can hide behind an animated animal emoji which tracks your facial movements. Scary times indeed!”

DVD EXTRAS:
• Audio Commentary with writers Frazer Lee, John Shackleton & David Shillitoe,
• Trailer Galler
• Gag reel
• Outtake/deleted scenes
• Making of, Gallery
• Guerrilla Filmmakers Masterclass
• Flight School – How to get a film off the ground

PRODUCT INFORMATION:
Format DVD
RRP £12.99
BBFC Certificate 18
Genre Horror, Thriller
Running Time 95 minutes
Language English
Country of origin UK
Distributor Trinity Film

CREDITS:
PANIC BUTTON is a MOVIE MOGUL PRODUCTION, starring SCARLETT ALICE JOHNSON JACK GORDON MICHAEL JIBSON ELEN RHYS and JOSHUA RICHARDS.
Costume Designer: SIAN JENKINS, Hair and make up by VICTORIA NORTHBROOKE Production Designer: TIM DICKEL, Director of Photography: SIMON POULTER, Edited by JOHN GILLANDERS, music by MARK RUTHERFORD, Line Producer: GARETH I DAVIES, co-producer: DAVID SHILLITOE
Written by FRAZER LEE, JOHN SHACKLETON, DAVID SHILLITOE & CHRIS CROW
Produced by JOHN SHACKLETON & directed by CHRIS CROW

Retail link – https://store.hmv.com/film-tv/dvd/panic-button

Press contact:
Greg Day – Clout Communications UK
greg@cloutcom..co.uk 07889 861646 www.twitter.com/cloutcomcouk

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FILM NEWS (UK): Horror Channel FrightFest announces line-up for Halloween 2017 event

Horror Channel FrightFest Halloween 2017 unleashes seven choice shockers for the 7th annual West End Halloween chillorama – a wits-end wallow in all things gruesome, gory and glorious.

This year, the all-day shocktoberfest is at the Empire Haymarket on Sat Oct 28, 2017 and embraces one world, one European and five UK premieres, spanning three continents.

From the emotional making of a low-budget slasher to zombie nightmares, Gothic horrors, an outrageously strange mind cult, a sci-fi alien action extravaganza, a comic strip creature feature and the last word in Killer Clowns, this year’s line-up is an eclectic mix of the quirky, unusual and extreme.

Alan Jones, FrightFest co-director said today: “After FrightFest’s successful return to central London in August for our biggest and most acclaimed event yet, we’re pleased to announce our equally ambitious, and extended Halloween spooktacular. The line-up is a heady cocktail of horror, fantasy and sci-fi, which we hope haunts your nightmares until our Glasgow grindhouser next March”.

Attending guests will be announced shortly.

Tickets go on sale from noon on Sun 1 Oct. Passes: £45, single tickets: £14.50.
Bookings: http://www.frightfest.co.uk/tickets.html
Remaining single tickets can also be bought at the cinema on the day.

FULL LINE UP:

10:00 HORROR MOVIE: A LOW BUDGET NIGHTMARE (European Premiere)

Director: Gary Doust. Cast: Craig Anderson, Dee Wallace, Gerard Odwyer, Bryan Moses, Robert Anderson. Australia 2017. 99 mins.

A funny, sad, candid and revealing documentary on the making of RED CHRISTMAS, a recent FrightFest favourite. Sick of playing quirky roles on Australian TV shows, actor/filmmaker Craig Anderson puts everything on the line to make his first low budget slasher about an aborted foetus seeking revenge on its family. With money issues, union troubles, an angry Hollywood Scream Queen and even a circumcision to overcome, we follow Craig’s nail-biting rollercoaster production journey as he gambles his family’s life savings to relaunch his career as a horror film director in the highly competitive digital age of moviemaking and distribution.

12:05 HOSTILE (UK Premiere)

David Gasman. USA 2017. 82 mins.

A worldwide epidemic has killed most of the planet’s population. The few survivors struggle to find food and shelter. But they are not alone, for the ravaged remnants of society go hunting at night for human flesh. On her way back to base camp from a foraging expedition, Juliette has a terrible accident. Stuck in her car, with a broken leg, in the middle of an unforgiving desert, she must survive the perils of the post-apocalypse while a strange creature prowls around… From producer Xavier Gens, director of THE DIVIDE and FRONTIER(S), a terrifying, moving and unusual shocker.

14:10 THE BLACK GLOVES (World Premiere)

Director: Lawrie Brewster. Cast: Macarena Gómez, Nicholas Vince, Alexandra Nicole Hulme, Craig J. Seath, Jamie Scott Gordon. UK 2017. 80 mins.

The terrifying story of a psychologist obsessed with the disappearance of his young patient and the menacing owl-headed figure that plagued her nightmares. His investigations lead him to a reclusive ballerina who, just like his patient, is convinced that she is about to die at the hands of this disturbing entity. In the bleak Scottish highlands, Finn counsels his new patient, under the watchful eye of her sinister ballet teacher. He soon finds himself entangled in a pas-de-deux of paranoia, dark agendas and a maze of deadly twists and turns, as the legend of the Owlman becomes a terrifying reality.

16:10 IT CAME FROM THE DESERT (UK Premiere)

Director: Marko Mäkilaakso. Cast: Mark Arnold, Harry Lister Smith, Vanessa Grasse, Alec Mills, Callum McGowan. Finland/UK/Canada 2017. 89 mins.

Inspired by Cinemaware’s cult 1980s video game, itself motivated by the giant creature feature craze infesting 1950s Hollywood, get ready for the pulp action horror mutant monster movie of the year! It’s a terribly tall tale involving rival motocross heroes and cocooned heroines, out-of-control kegger parties in the New Mexico desert, crashed meteors from outer space, secret underground labyrinth military bases, romantic insecurities …and epic havoc caused by massive spider/ant hybrids! Smartly scripted, extremely funny and very creepy, with terrific special effects in homage to Ray Harryhausen, get with the OTT deadpan delivery and the Project T.H.E.M. program.

18:45 HOUSEWIFE (UK Premiere)

Director: Can Evrenol. Cast: Clémentine Poidatz, David Sakurai, Ali Aksöz, Defne Halman, Alicia Kapudag. Turkey 2017. 82 mins.

The first English-language feature from innovative Turkish director Can Evrenol who took shocked audiences on a tour of hell in BASKIN. After that homage to John Carpenter, join the Turkish delight as he navigates Dario Argento and Lucio Fulci territory with another pitch black delve into dark sexuality, family values, social claustrophobia, and outrageous nightmares. On a snowy eve, little Holly’s sister and father are killed by her frantic mother. Twenty years later, Holly is married, lonely, and her life is soon about take a turn for the ultra-weird when she visits the ‘Umbrella of Love and Mind’ cult.

20:40 BEYOND SKYLINE (UK Premiere)

Director: Liam O’Donnell. Cast: Frank Grillo, Bojana Novakovic, Iko Uwais, Johnny Weston, Antonio Fargas. USA/Indonesia 2017. 105 mins.

In the highly-anticipated sequel to the 2010 breakout blockbuster hit SKYLINE, tough-as-nails detective Mark (THE PURGE star Frank Grillo) embarks on a relentless pursuit to free his embittered rebellious son Trent (Johnny Weston) from a nightmarish alien warship as the extraterrestrial menace continues its human harvest. Set concurrently with the original sci-fi shocker, with Mark and Trent trapped on a subway train as the intergalactic invasion begins, THE RAID franchise martial arts star Iko Uwais joins the thrilling turbo-charged action adventure as a disparate group of survivors must learn the true meaning of family.

23:00 TERRIFIER (UK Premiere)

Director: Damien Leone. Cast: Jenna Kanell, Catherine Corcoran, Margaret Reed, Katie Maguire, David Howard Thornton. USA 2017. 82 mins.

You thrilled to IT, now chill to Art the maniacal clown of all your worst nightmares. Appearing initially in director Damien Leone’s 2008 short THE 9th CIRCLE, then the 2011 award-winning short TERRIFIER, horrifying Art returns for his first full-length frightener. Here Leone delivers all the gore and much more in this slasher exploitation extravaganza that’s both lip-smackingly disturbing and screamingly shocking. For Art is back on the silent prowl ready to terrorize three young women on Halloween night and anybody who stands in his dismembering way.

Press and publicity enquires:
Greg Day @ Clout Communications Ltd
07889 861646 greg@cloutcom.co.uk

High res images: http://cloutcom.co.uk/picture-gallery/frightfest-halloween-2017/

www.frightfest.co.uk

@frightfest

https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/frightfest/?hl=en

https://www.facebook.com/groups/FrightFest/

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